Review: A Nazi Comparison at Waterloo East Theatre

Based on Schlageter by Hanns Johst – Hitler’s favourite playwright – Craft Theatre’s A Nazi Comparison makes some solid points and clearly has good intentions. I really wanted to like it, but an unnecessary excess of drama makes it difficult to see past the tears and shouting to get to the message behind.

Clare is a PR student at UCL preparing for a big presentation, but after one of her lecturers lends her a copy of Schlageter and she falls for a guy at a Grenfell protest, she starts looking into the unnerving similarities between Nazi propaganda and the rhetoric of today’s press. It doesn’t take long for her to realise that if you replaced “Jews” with “Muslims” in the speeches, it sounds very much like something Donald Trump would say. In the end, unable to stomach the idea of joining a PR machine that knowingly misleads the public, she withdraws from her degree course in sensational fashion.

So far, so good. After we’re treated to a short video presentation about the unfair representation of Jeremy Corbyn by the British media, Louise Goodfield delivers Clare’s fateful presentation with genuine passion – and even if it does start to feel a bit like we’ve wandered into a political rally rather than a play, you can’t help but admire her for having the courage of her convictions and standing up for what she believes is right. Unfortunately, her mum (Helen Foster) doesn’t even attempt to feel the same way, and it’s not long before the two are embroiled in a screaming row – not their first or last of the evening – about all the ways she’s endangered her future. Nor is her mum the only one who can’t understand her decision, and soon Clare finds herself living in a squat with Craig (Craig Edgely), the guy from the Grenfell protest. This goes well for a while – the exact timeframe of the play is unclear – until Craig decides group leader Lucas (Lucas John Mahoney) and his strategy of peaceful protest aren’t working for him any more. Cue more shouting and a dramatic off-stage twist, followed by an even more dramatic on-stage finale.

All this drama starts to get in the way more and more as the play enters its second hour. Nobody seems capable of having a rational discussion; every conversation quickly turns into an argument, with people shouting over each other, sobbing, wailing and generally being far more melodramatic than seems necessary. By the end, it’s all unfortunately a bit of a mess, and not at all clear any more what point is being made, who we’re supposed to be supporting or why.

All that said, there are some very touching scenes between Clare and her dad (Thomas Thoroe), who unlike his ex-wife at least tries to understand where his daughter’s coming from. The physical ensemble work is very slick, particularly in the montage sequence (a bizarrely timed comic interlude) and after each scene, when the cast somersault across the stage like ninjas to get in position for the next. And there’s no faulting the conviction of the company; I would just have liked a bit less raw emotion and a bit more rational debate to help me understand what, beyond the obvious Nazi comparison, I was meant to be taking away.


Can’t see the map on iPhone? Try turning your phone to landscape and that should sort it. I don’t know why but I’m working on it… 😉

Theatre round-up: 12 July 2015

Four very different theatre experiences this week, beginning with…

Dead Simple

A thriller based on the novel by crime writer Peter James, at the Marlowe Theatre in Canterbury. It’s the story of a man buried alive on his stag night, only for all his friends to die in a horrible accident and leave him there. (Not good if you suffer from claustrophobia.) A very complex plot condensed into two hours means there are obviously going to be a few plot gaps, but it’s suitably chilling and good entertainment.

Dead Simple review

Cinderella

Acclaimed choreographer Christopher Wheeldon’s Cinderella is a different take on a well-known story. There’s no fairy godmother, no pumpkins – not even a glass slipper. But even though it’s based on the Brothers Grimm version of the story, this ballet is still just as magical, romantic and funny as the fairy tale we all know and love. It was also my first go at reviewing ballet, which was a fun challenge 😉

Cinderella review for LondonTheatre1.com

Constellations

Having heard some great things about Constellations, which began life at the Royal Court Theatre in 2012, I was excited by the opportunity to see it at Trafalgar Studios this week. A romantic drama with added physics, it makes you laugh and cry, while considering the multiple possible paths life can take. With stunning performances from Louise Brealey and Joe Armstrong, this is a must-see.

Constellations review for London Theatre Direct – link to follow

The Diver

A one-woman show from Helen Foster of Craft Theatre, this is not a ‘sit in the dark and say nothing’ theatre experience. Everyone in the audience is expected to play their part in the story – but luckily it’s so much fun that you really don’t mind getting involved. It’s a show about knowing what you want from life and having the courage to pursue it. And it’s completely bonkers, but there’s nothing wrong with that.

The Diver review for Carn’s Theatre Passion

This week's theatre

Next week’s theatre

Shakespeare’s R and J (Chapel Lane Theatre Company) at Tabard Theatre

The Gathered Leaves (Dead Letter Perfect) at Park Theatre