Interview: Matthew Seager, Bobblehat Festival

With Christmas now just a couple of weeks away, it’s fair to say the holiday season is well and truly upon us. And this year there’s a special festive surprise (or 24 of them, to be more accurate) lying in wait around Wimbledon, courtesy of the team at Bobblehat. But what’s it all about, and why should we be excited?

“Bobblehat is London’s first live advent calendar,” explains Creative Producer Matthew Seager. “Every day from 1st to 24th December a different door opens somewhere in the Wimbledon area, and an exciting event takes place. We’ve got poetry, theatre, music, dance, comedy and much more. 24 events, 24 days, 24 locations… what’s not to be excited about! Oh, and it’s all FREE…”

Extempore (20th December)

Bobblehat is the first project for William Alder Productions, which was founded in 2016 to create new experiences for audiences by putting on exciting events in unusual places. “Will is the Artistic Director, running the event with me and General Manager Sam Griffiths,” says Matthew. “Will worked on a similar event in Winchester back in 2015, although we think the idea of the advent festival originated in Stockholm.

“Both producers are born and brought up in Wimbledon, so it seemed to make sense to launch here. This festival is all about great events in unexpected places, so I think it takes a pretty in depth understanding of the layout and location of the town to really match the right act with the right location.”

With so many different locations to organise, the team first had to secure support from the local business community. Fortunately, that didn’t prove to be a problem: “The response has been overwhelmingly positive,” says Matthew. “Firstly, the festival would most definitely not have gone ahead without the sponsorship and all round support of Love Wimbledon, who are just brilliant. In general, when seeking support from a local business, the most successful approach is just to be passionate about the event and the town. These people own a business in Wimbledon so, in general, it we’re able to get them excited about this then they are happy to support.”

Louise Alder (23rd December)

Matthew and the team have particularly loved the challenge of putting together the month-long programme: “I think that’s one of my favourite parts. We’re in a position to contact artists we already have a relationship with, as well as get in contact with artists we’ve always admired and wanted to work with. Also it’s an opportunity to go to Edinburgh and see lots of shows all over the UK in search of a truly varied programme.”

With the festival now nine days in, there have already been plenty of highlights – and Matthew assures us there are plenty more to look forward to. “They’re all my favourites! They really balance each other out, which is important. We opened with award-winning Shakespeare company The HandleBards in the lower car park of Centre Court shopping centre, we’ve had a silent disco guided tour and an interactive musical family show where you colour in your favourite Christmas meal.

“Coming up we’ve got sketch comedy double act Goodbear on the 14th, who sold out at the Soho Theatre recently. I’m really excited about Extempore theatre – of Showstopper! The Improvised Musical in the West End – with their two-hander Rhapsodes on the 20th, Lead Suspect, a dog murder mystery, on the 21st, and internationally award-winning Soprano Louise Alder on the 23rd. But they are alllll brilliant and there’s definitely something for everyone.”

Attending a Bobblehat event is easy – and if you’re out and about in Wimbledon you might even find yourself turning up to one by accident… “You can’t book tickets, you just turn up to the door that is advertised on our website or social media,” explains Matthew. “It will open at either 4pm or 7pm, and away we go. There will be a sign outside and we’ve definitely had people stumble upon events whilst out and about. I wasn’t sure how that would work going into this, but it’s wonderful to attract both groups of people who have researched the event as well as those who just happen to be around.”

Check out the Bobblehat website or follow @wearebobblehat to see what’s coming up. All events are free to attend.

Interview: Kate Perry, The Very Perry Show

Kate Perry is an actress, radio presenter and writer originally from Dungannon, Co. Tyrone, known and loved by audiences worldwide for her comedy monologues and colourful characters. This November, Kate brings The Very Perry Show – which she describes as “a happy hour of comic monologues featuring a pair of glasses, a rubber hat and a can of WD40” – to London’s Hen and Chickens, following huge success in Edinburgh, San Francisco and beyond. After the London run, she’ll be heading to New York to perform the show in the prestigious United Theatre Solo Festival.

The story of Kate’s career begins back in the 1990s: “I started my writing and acting career presenting my characters in a little venue called The Marsh in the Mission district of San Francisco, which is still going strong today,” she explains. “I was also a member of The Fifth Province Theatre Company, that put on contemporary Irish plays and I got a lot of experience acting with them. While still living in San Francisco I adapted the novel No Mate For The Magpie for the stage, which premiered in the U.S. and toured Ireland to critical acclaim.

“When I returned to Ireland in the late nineties I continued to write and perform my own material but was also offered opportunities to write for radio, which opened up doors for me on RTE, the national broadcaster, and then BBC Radio 4. I completed an MPhil in creative writing in Trinity College, Dublin then made the move to London in 2014. Since then I have been developing The Very Perry Show, performing it in London, Ireland, Edinburgh and San Francisco.”

In a career spanning almost three decades, it’s not surprising that there have been a lot of highlights. “One of the biggest has been getting commissioned to write a Woman’s Hour series based on sketches I had written for The Dublin Fringe Festival,” recalls Kate. “Also, writing monologues and short stories for BBC Radio 4 for the fabulously talented Tamsin Grieg, Doreen Keogh and Conleth Hill. More recently I have been given the opportunity to perform my show in New York, on 42nd Street as part of The United Theater Solo Festival, the largest solo festival in the world.”

The show’s directed by Jeremy Stockwell, and features a collection of eccentric characters, including an unhinged documentary maker, a pious pigeon fancier and a six year old ‘entertaining’ a captive audience on a long distance flight. But which of Kate’s creations is her favourite? “Hard to say, I like them all but I do have a soft spot for Mary Peachy-Bender, a disgruntled Amish woman with too many children,” she confesses. “She’s quietly subversive and audiences are always intrigued about where her story is leading. So am I!”


Even now, Kate admits to still feeling pre-show nerves, but she’s looking forward to introducing her characters to new audiences in London and New York: “I’m terrified before I step on to the stage; it usually starts with a gulp, gulp, and barf. But once I’m up there and have a receptive audience who connects with the material, then it’s a real pleasure to make people laugh and bring a little sunshine to their day.

“I think the key to good comedy is a matter of taste. Because I do character work I think it’s important to give the audience something recognisable. Someone they can latch on to and care about. You need to make it real, even if the characters seem ridiculous or are left of field.”

So why should we come and check out The Very Perry Show this November? “There’s something or somebody in it for everyone,” says Kate. “The characters include everything from a 5 year old to a 75 year old and everything in between. Even a man! And it’s only £8.50 a ticket…”

Catch The Very Perry Show at the Hen and Chickens from 7th-11th November.

Interview: Francesca Mepham, FEMM Theatre

FEMM Theatre is a new company producing fresh and exciting theatre by female artists, whose debut production comes to the Bread and Roses Theatre next month. No One Wants A Pretty Girl is a collection of six contemporary female monologues, written by FEMM Theatre’s founder Francesca Mepham.

“It was such a spontaneous decision; I knew I wanted to produce my new play and thought it was time I created my own theatre company,” explains Fran. “The initials of my full name happen to be FEMM, so it was fate that I wanted the theatre company to be one that supports and promotes female creatives. This isn’t to say we are not supporting male creatives, quite the opposite; we want to promote equality and diversity in the arts. I want to support other females, as in this industry that is so important – females showing solidarity to fellow females. You can never have too much kindness!”

Although she’s new to running a theatre company, the multitalented Fran is certainly no stranger to working in the arts: “Well my career’s definitely been varied, which I absolutely love. It’s involved performing, writing, reviewing and PRing! Performing began when I was very young; I was a member of Beck Youth Theatre, who were so supportive of what I wanted to do, which was to simply be creative. I graduated with a BMus Hons degree and I’ve been very fortunate and performed as an events/session vocalist ever since.

“I’ve always written, but it wasn’t until I started reviewing theatre productions a couple of years ago, that I realised I wanted to explore theatre writing and acting again. You could say I just dived straight in and went for it, producing my own plays and now I have my own theatre company! Also, I have a blog called Frantastic View, that aims to inspire other creatives and give an honest look at life in the arts. And I’m Press Manager for Orzu Arts, Britain’s first Central Asian Theatre Company, so I’m always immersing myself in the arts industry somehow!”

Unsurprisingly in such a long and varied career, there have been a lot of highlights. “I’ve been fortunate to have some wonderful creatives want to work with me as a writer and a performer,” says Fran. “Performing at Edinburgh is a real highlight, and I’ve recently been chosen for a night of female playwrights produced by Instinct Theatre at The Bread and Roses Theatre. The support for FEMM Theatre has been a huge highlight of 2017. I’ve also recently written for NewsRevue which has been a lot of fun. In the last few weeks I’ve signed to Helen McWilliams Management Agency which has been wonderful, to have that faith in me as an artist.”

No One Wants A Pretty Girl – written by Fran and directed by Laura Clifford – will be performed in its entirety for the first time at the Bread and Roses in Clapham on 16th October. “It’s a collection of six monologues – Should, Jade Jacket and Trousers, Side B*tch, My Daddy Is Mexican, No Shame and Saturday Night – each performed by one of the six-strong female cast,” says Fran. “Each monologue explores the theme of having a secret behind the smile, an inner sadness which we can all identify. There are themes of heartbreak, loneliness, prejudice, to name just a few; there is no sugar coating, just a rawness from each character. This is life and even in sadness there is beauty.

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“I wrote Should for Theatrefullstop in late 2015 at 2am for their Monologue Monday, which they were filming for their blog, and I continued writing monologues for the collection – initially three, those being Jade Jacket and Trousers and Side B*tch which they recorded for their podcast late last year, with actress Charlotte Hunt. It was actually Charlotte who said how much her friends she worked with at a call centre, who were also actresses, had enjoyed reading the monologues, as there aren’t that many contemporary monologues for women in their 20s-30s that are relatable out there.

“Then in March of this year, Should was performed at Instinct Theatre’s Scratch The Surface at The Hen and Chickens Theatre, directed by Laura Clifford and performed by Tayo Elesin. I realised that from its warm reaction, I had to write more and make the monologue collection into a full length show, with Laura’s amazing direction. Big thanks to Theatrefullstop and Instinct Theatre, two female-led theatre tour de forces, who have been so supportive of No One Wants A Pretty Girl.”

One of Fran’s primary goals with FEMM Theatre is to promote diversity of all kinds in theatre and the arts. “It’s so important as diversity equals equality; theatre needs to give all creatives equal opportunities,” she says. “Glass ceilings need to be shattered and the industry needs to be aware of theatre makers that need that extra encouragement and support. We all need to support each other in theatre. With FEMM, we put our ethos in to action and cast BAME actors as a priority. That’s what needs to be done – a little less conversation and more positive action in the arts. We also want to address the problem of ageism, especially towards actresses in theatre.”

And finally, to anyone – particularly women – thinking about getting into playwriting, Fran has a few words of advice: “Do it! Literally go for it, be bold, be brave and just be yourself.”

Book now for No One Wants A Pretty Girl at the Bread and Roses on 16th October.

Interview: Ross McGregor, Frankenstein

Arrows & Traps were last seen at the Brockley Jack Studio Theatre in February with their acclaimed production of Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment. Now they’ve turned their attention to another classic novel: Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein.

“It’s the 200 year anniversary of Mary Shelley’s original novel, so it seemed a great time to tackle the piece,” says director and writer Ross McGregor. “Frankenstein is so iconic as well, it’s ingrained in our literary and cinematic history, and there’s been over 100 different adaptations both on stage and screen. It’s such a flexible and deep piece of literature – I found the ideas that Shelley talks about in the novel to be fascinating and worthy of dramatic exploration. Plus, it’s just so much fun to do. There’s literally a scene when a monster made of dead people comes to life. You don’t get that in Alan Ayckbourn.”

Frankenstein is the eleventh show from Arrows & Traps, known for their innovative adaptations of literary classics – and it could be their most ambitious project yet. “In many ways, it has all the hallmarks of an Arrows show: the tight ensemble work, the physical pieces, the fluid staging and the excitement of seeing a classic story told in a new, and hopefully interesting, way,” says Ross. “What makes Frankenstein different from anything we’ve done before is that we’re telling three stories at once. Victor’s, The Creature’s, but also Mary Shelley’s. It’s a triple narrative all being told simultaneously, which makes for some exciting viewing.

“Also, this is the first production that I’ve actually written myself, as well as directing it, so rehearsals have been a voyage of discovery in terms of staging the piece, finding what works, what needs clarifying, and how best to tell the stories we want to tell. It’s been a fascinating and gruelling process of vision and revision. I’m slowly learning the importance of being able to kill your darlings.

“There are moments when it is as though the ghosts in my head are literally manifesting in front of me, which is very moving and humbling, and there is always a great relief when a particular bit or a specific scene is rehearsed and it ‘works’. So often what might look acceptable on paper doesn’t then work in performance, so it’s always lovely to see something that translates and makes the leap. The cast is bringing an awful lot to the roles though, and I’m constantly surprised by all the new layers they’re discovering. It’s been a joy to be involved in.”

Ross explains that in his research for the show, he became fascinated by the story of Mary Shelley: “Her world was filled with characters such as Lord Byron, Percy Shelley, her father William Godwin, her mother Mary Wollstonecraft, her sisters Jane and Fanny, Shelley’s wife Harriet – all of these people would have made a great play in their own right – but what principally struck me was the notion of all the strange parallels in her own life to Frankenstein. Now Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein when she was nineteen, and although there were definitely things in her childhood that inspired her to write the book, her subsequent life after the novel’s publication shared many strange links to the book, almost as though she cursed herself by writing it. The more I delved into the real story around Frankenstein, the more I wanted to include it in the play.

“So yes, Mary is a main character in the show. And not just as a narrator, she has a part to play in it. She’s older now, suffering from a terminal brain tumour in fact, and is tormented by something that happened in her youth. Something that ties directly into Frankenstein. And so as we see the story of Victor and his Creature unfold, we also see Mary relive her past, with the cast playing roles in both worlds, leaping from one timeline to the other. It’s something of a rollercoaster to watch. I’m very excited about it.”

In adapting the novel, Ross encountered various challenges – one of which was sidestepping the traditional Hollywood image of Frankenstein’s monster. “Initially, I was very faithful,” he explains. “I had always seen the Creature as this lumbering, bolts in the neck, flat-headed lummox that groaned at people, but in the novel, he’s very graceful and agile. The Creature in the novel is very eloquent and possibly as smart as his creator. I wanted to try and mimic that, because I hadn’t found a version where that had ever been attempted.

“In the novel also, there’s no motivation for Victor’s need to create this monster – he just does it because he can. So I knew I wanted to humanise Victor and make him more sympathetic, more flawed, more human, more understandably motivated. So it’s been about balancing those two things. Also, the novel itself isn’t very dramatic and doesn’t lend itself easily to being dramatised. The iconic bits that you probably think of when you think of ‘Frankenstein’ are not from the novel. There’s no ‘IT’S ALIVE!’, there’s no character called Igor, there’s not even any mention of the Creature being scarred or covered in stitches or bolts. All of that is from the films.

“The novel concerns itself with ideas of nature versus nurture, of the perils of parenthood and the isolation caused by abandonment. The hubris of genius. So in adapting it, I have tried to stay true to Mary Shelley’s vision, whilst constructing something that stands on its own two feet as a piece of theatre. And from being in rehearsal, I can certainly tell you we’re making something inherently theatrical.”

The show’s cast includes a mix of Arrows veterans and new recruits: “The brilliant Christopher Tester plays Victor Frankenstein; Arrows fans may recall his recent performance as Raskolnikov in our last production Crime and Punishment, for which he was nominated for an Off West End Award for Best Male. We have the incredibly talented Cornelia Baumann returning to play Mary Shelley, after her recent turn as Olivia and Emilia in our repertory Shakespeare season of Twelfth Night and Othello last year, and we are honoured to have our resident movement director genius Will Pinchin playing the Creature, which I’m so excited about as I’ve wanted to get Will on stage in one of our shows for years. 

“We have Philip Ridout, of this year’s festival circuit hit Dogged fame, playing William Godwin, and recent Oxford School of Drama graduate Victoria Llewellyn playing Elizabeth Lavenza. I recently had the honour of directing for Fourth Monkey Theatre Company as part of their One Year Actor Training program so we’ve got three of their very talented graduates involved: Zoe Dales playing Agatha, Beatrice Vincent playing Fanny Imlay and Oliver Brassell playing Henry Clerval. It is an honour to have all these guys involved and the benefit of knowing who the cast were when the script was still under construction was that I could write it with them in mind and tailor it to them.”

With Halloween just around the corner, theatregoers in search of something a bit scary are likely to have plenty of options – so why should we book to see Frankenstein? Over to the writer: “It’s a gothic steampunk horror set in two different timelines, playing just before Halloween, in one of London’s most iconic and welcoming fringe venues, by a company that cares greatly for the source material and has spent the last three years working to hone their skills and push fringe theatre to the limit of what it can do in terms of ensemble, spectacle and excitement. Frankenstein is quite scary, quite funny, quite sad, and very very exciting. I’d definitely go, and I’m rubbish with scary things.”

Frankenstein opens at the Brockley Jack on 26th September, continuing until 21st October, followed by a brief run at Yvonne Arnaud Theatre in Guildford from 2nd-4th November.

Interview: Frankie Meredith, Turkey

Frankie Meredith makes her writing debut this month with Turkey, which opens at The Hope Theatre on 26th September. Directed by Lonesome Schoolboy Productions’ Niall Phillips, it’s a story about one woman’s overwhelming desire to have a baby with her girlfriend – and the lengths to which she’s willing to go to get what she wants.

Turkey explores whether this innate need stems from her own biological clock, a grief she experienced as a teen or the expectation to be seen as ‘normal’,” explains Frankie. “It looks at her ability to risk and ruin everything in her life to get the child she so strongly yearns for.”

Though the characters are fictional, Frankie’s inspiration for Turkey was a true story: “It was written when I was on the Soho Theatre Young Writers Lab and started out as a six page exercise in scene structure. They told us to write a story based on an old family tale or something that happened within our family. It then became the play that I developed while I was on the course.

“I told the person the story is based on very recently, and they’re thrilled – luckily.”

Frankie feels this is a particularly important story to tell because it confronts issues people otherwise may not think about: “Gay couples having babies is talked about, but what about the morals or dilemmas they face on where they get the sperm from? If you don’t have the money to go to a posh west London clinic who on earth are you going to ask to give you their sperm? Grief is also a big part of this play. It is an issue all the characters are facing and has a huge impact on many of their decisions and actions.”

The play’s central character, Madeline, is far from perfect, and Frankie’s hoping audiences will be able to see past that and understand why she behaves the way she does. “I’ve placed a really strong, manipulative, flawed female at the helm of this play and I want people to empathise with her,” she says. “So often we are quick to label women ‘mental’ or ‘crazy’ when they are just doing what needs to be done to get what they want. Madeline doesn’t commit any crimes, she isn’t evil, she’s just human. I would like audiences to not judge her for what she does.

“The play’s also funny – I hope – and relatable. There’s a lot of food and Netflix references to keep it all relevant. And though we don’t all identify with turkey basting, love, grief and desire are all emotions we experience and connect with – so there will be some part of this play that is relatable and relevant to you.”

Having been very involved in the casting process, Frankie is looking forward to seeing the three actors – Pevyand Sadeghian, Cameron Robertson and Harriet Green – bring her words to life on stage. “The cast are phenomenal! I’m so excited to see what they do with the text. Pevyand (Madeline) we found through an open casting; she was actually the first one through the door and we fell in love with her. Cameron Robertson has worked with Niall before, and Niall kept telling me what a wonderful Michael he would make – he was not wrong. He came in to read and was just perfect.

“Finally Harriet Green and I trained at drama school together, she has read numerous drafts of Turkey and was someone I’d go to for help when developing. We asked her to do a self tape and she met Niall for a coffee and a read through. I can’t wait to see what she does with Toni, she has a real magnetism and truth to her performances.”

Frankie herself became involved with Lonesome Schoolboy earlier this year. “I sent this script to Niall and he asked to meet me for a coffee,” she explains. “We met a couple of days later and almost immediately got the ball rolling on staging Turkey. He has a great relationship with Matthew Parker at The Hope and soon we were chatting to him about when Turkey could be on.

“We did a few R&Ds together to develop the script as well as use it as a way to meet new actors. Niall’s energy in a rehearsal or workshop space is pretty special. I’m sure this is the start of a long and happy working relationship.”

Besides Turkey, Frankie has several other projects on the go: “I’ve just finished the first drafts of a couple of scripts. The next step is to get some actors in a room to play around with them and develop the texts further. I’m also currently editing a web series I wrote and directed with my production company MapleRoad Productions. It’s called Becoming Danish and should hit screens early 2018!

“And my first children’s show Saving Peter, about Wendy going back to Neverland to rescue Peter, is on at Theatre N16 in Balham in the last week of October, so we’re gearing up to get started on that.”

Book now for Turkey at The Hope Theatre from 26th September-14th October.