Review: Fast at Park Theatre

Based on a true story, Kate Barton’s play Fast invites its audience into the disturbing world of “Dr” Linda Hazzard (Caroline Lawrie), whose controversial fasting diet method claimed the lives of multiple patients in the early 20th century. In particular the play focuses on the case of Claire and Dora Williamson (Jordon Stevens and Natasha Cowley), two wealthy English sisters who sought Hazzard’s help, with tragic consequences.

The premise of the play is already chilling enough, but director Kate Valentine’s production ramps up the creepiness to the point where you wonder how Hazzard could possibly have got away with it for so long. The design work by Emily Bestow (set and costumes), David Chilton (sound) and Ben Bull (lighting) is pure black and white horror movie: the sanitarium is dark and echoey, with flickering lights, ripped and stained curtains and sinister dripping noises. From the start, its owner has every appearance of being a fanatic, who makes up her patients’ room by pulling the beds out of the wall just like drawers in a morgue. Watching the Williamson sisters check in strongly resembles the moment in a movie when the unwitting victims enter the haunted house of their own free will, despite everyone in the audience willing them to run the other way. Throw in a power cut, a thunderstorm and something very bad waiting to be discovered in a bathtub, and you’ve got the makings of a very creepy play indeed.

All this leaves us in no doubt that Linda Hazzard was a monster, who preyed on the anxiety and gullibility of her patients, starved them for weeks on end, and then stole their possessions after they died. What the play doesn’t do so well is to explain why she did any of this. Caroline Lawrie is excellent in her portrayal of the “doctor”, and it’s clear from the earnest way she addresses the audience that she genuinely believes in her own methods (so much so that in the end, she herself died as a result of them). But the horror movie aspect is such a dominant presence throughout that this clearly complicated character lacks depth, and even when Hazzard raises reasonable points – such as the media’s insistence on calling her a “woman doctor” – it’s difficult to see her as anything other than a self-serving villain.

Her victims, on the other hand, are far easier to relate to, their vague health concerns and desperate need to believe in anything that will make them feel better all too recognisable over a century later. Natasha Cowley and Jordon Stevens make a strong and convincing partnership as the chalk and cheese sisters, the former no-nonsense and cynical, the latter romantic and dreamy. Once inside the sanitarium, their one hope of salvation is Daniel Norford’s charming and resourceful Horace Cayton Jnr., a journalist who follows his instincts and ultimately plays a key role in bringing Hazzard to justice.

Taken at face value as a thriller, Fast works well enough, and the production is particularly strong from a design perspective (although – small gripe – some of the sight lines could be improved; sitting three rows back, it’s hard to see what’s happening at ground level, much of which is pretty important). At times, though, it feels like the play is too caught up in the undeniably gory details of “Dr” Hazzard’s career, and consequently it fails to open up any meaningful discussion about how or why such a horrific chain of events could have taken place. Similarly, there are parallels to be drawn with the fad diets and wellness trends of the 21st century, but these aren’t really explored in any depth. Based on a repellent but fascinating historical figure, the play doesn’t quite live up to its potential – but as Halloween approaches, horror movie fans will certainly find plenty to enjoy in this chilling new play.

Fast is at Park Theatre until 9th November.

Review: The House of Yes at The Hope Theatre

Bringing to a close Matthew Parker’s critically acclaimed tenure at The Hope, The House of Yes is a jet-black comedy drama that very much sees the theatre’s outgoing artistic director leave with a bang. Deeply twisted in a variety of ways, Wendy MacLeod’s story of the dysfunctional Pascal family is both horrifying and hilarious, and in this production it’s performed exquisitely by the cast of five.

It’s Thanksgiving, and Marty (Fergus Leathem) is bringing his fiancée Lesly (Kaya Bucholc) home to meet the family. The problem? His family… By their own admission, the Pascals have never had a guest before, and it’s unlikely they’ll ever have one again once the dust settles on this particularly eventful 24 hours. Marty’s twin sister Jackie-O (Colette Eaton) has two obsessions: her namesake, the former First Lady; and – unfortunately for him – Marty. Younger brother Anthony (Bart Lambert) is a college dropout whose eye falls rather too enthusiastically on his brother’s future wife. And through it all, their mother (Gill King), a self-professed “free spirit”, wafts around the house, seemingly taking little interest in her children’s lives… but in reality paying just a bit too much attention to what they’re getting up to.

What’s particularly enjoyable about this production is the care each actor puts into their performance. It’s impossible to choose a standout performance when each of them is so captivating. Every detail – the way a line is delivered, the movements and gestures, the facial expressions and eye rolls – feels perfectly timed and judged. The characters are, to put it kindly, not normal people – and yet somehow they come across as three-dimensional and 100% believable, particularly in the setting of their gloomy, claustrophobic house, with the power out and a hurricane raging outside. Rachael Ryan’s set design perfectly captures the essence of a home whose former splendour has now well and truly faded, even if that message hasn’t quite reached the Pascals themselves. It’s all a bit Addams Family meets Hotel California; both house and residents seem to have a way of ensnaring those who step inside, and the thought of anyone ever leaving becomes increasingly remote as the evening goes on.

Photo credit: lhphotoshots

As hard as it may be to believe, this dark and twisted tale is also very funny, despite that constant creeping sense that all will not end well. Much of our laughter is the result of surprise; these are characters who just say whatever’s on their mind, whether or not it’s considered appropriate – and as dysfunctional as they undeniably all are, there’s something quite refreshing and enjoyable about that openness.

The House of Yes may not be everyone’s cup of tea, but for those who are willing to let themselves be drawn into the Pascals’ crazy little world, there’s so much to enjoy about this expertly put together production. It’s a fitting and suitably offbeat farewell from Matthew Parker, a play that will make you laugh, recoil, and possibly have a nightmare or two. But don’t panic – they do let you out at the end. Honest.

The House of Yes is at The Hope Theatre until 26th October.

Quick Q&A: Good Gracious Good Friday

Where and when: White Bear Theatre, 16th-18th October

What it’s all about… Good Gracious, Good Friday takes place in Belfast, Northern Ireland on the night of the 1998 Good Friday Agreement referendum result, as four (mostly hungover) twenty-somethings come together to use the historic occasion as an excuse to drink all over again. Although they claim they have no interest in the “boring news on the telly” as the evening draws on – their true feelings for their country, and each other, will be revealed. This is a nostalgic look back at a huge turning point in Northern Ireland’s history, with Game Boys and Tamagotchis thrown in for good measure!

You’ll like it if… you’re interested in The Good Friday Agreement which has been mentioned so much whenever Brexit is on the news. It’s been the main sticking point in the current negotiations, particularly when it comes to the matter of the Irish Border. Our play explores why the 1998 Good Friday Agreement was such a monumental event in Northern Irish, and U.K. history and what it meant to a younger generation who strived for peace – a generation who were knee deep in a late 90s cultural explosion of Britney Spears, Titanic and Supermarket Sweep – so yeah, they had all that to deal with too…….

You should see it because… the Good Friday Agreement has never been more prevalent than it was over 20 years ago. The very essence of Brexit brings into disrepute the good work so many British/Irish/American politicians set out to do, which was to bring peace to the island of Ireland. Just yesterday (14th October 2019) a Northern Irish citizen named Emma De Souza was told she could not claim her Irish citizenship – something The Good Friday Agreement set out to make possible in our time, and further beyond. Our play sets out to show how important The Good Friday Agreement was to Northern Ireland in 1998, and how it remains just as vital to the country, The Republic of Ireland and The U.K. today.

Where to follow:
Twitter: @GGGFPlay

Book here: www.whitebeartheatre.co.uk/whatson/Good-Gracious%2C-Good-Friday

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Quick Q&A: This Is It

Where and when: Etcetera Theatre, 28th at 9pm, 30th and 31st October at 7pm

What it’s all about… Presented by Blue Glass Theatre, This Is It is non-gendered and non-aged, meaning that this play will be able to have many and varied lives. Focusing on identity and where we hinge our identity in a world shifting under our feet, change is all around us.

This Is It is a dark comedy set at the end of the world. Three have survived this far…

You’ll like it if… you like Hot Fuzz, Black Summer, Noises Off!

You should see it because… it’s dark and funny and talks about how we communicate with each other. This Is It asks you to look at identity and how we view ourselves and what would happen if the world turned upside down. Annnddd it’s funny!

Anything else we should know…: It’s 60 minutes of sharp comedy and some scary bits too!

Where to follow:
Twitter: @glass_theatre
Facebook: @glasstheatre

Book here: www.citizenticket.co.uk/event/this-is-it

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Review: Classified at the Lion and Unicorn Theatre

Consisting of three short interlinking plays set in 2019 and a dystopian near future, Jayne Woodhouse’s Classified offers a chilling but not wholly unrecognisable glimpse of a Britain where social class has become our single defining characteristic.

In Choices Leanne (Kayley Rainton), a new mother, is interviewed by an official from the “Department of Life Choice Options” (David House), who knows everything about her living situation and employment history, and uses that knowledge to question her ability to raise her child. 60 years later, in Classified, a couple (Neil Gardner and Rosannah Lenaghan) argue over her decision to stop and help a “class Z” homeless man: a moment of compassion that could have an impact on their own class ranking – or worse. And finally in The Watchers, Sarah (Rainton) looks back on her mother’s decade of non-violent resistance to the system, and explains why she’s now chosen to respond in a different way.

Photo credit: John Bruce

The trio of plays is simply staged by director Calum Robshaw, but with universally strong writing and performances, the show nonetheless succeeds in making its point very effectively. Though each story is only 20 minutes long, the audience quickly becomes invested in the characters and what happens to them – perhaps because the world they live in and the attitudes within it, though extreme, are not entirely unfeasible. I’m sure, for instance, that while DOLCO isn’t (yet) a thing, the kind of interrogation to which eighteen-year-old Leanne is subjected three days after giving birth almost certainly does take place. Similarly, unwillingness to help those less fortunate because of the risk it might reflect badly on ourselves is taken to exaggerated lengths in the second play – but that attitude already exists in our current social and political climate. It’s easy to see how these stories could become reality, and by more than once bringing the audience into the action, the play shows us too how we could be complicit in making it happen.

Photo credit: John Bruce

The final play is perhaps the most challenging, because it asks us to consider how we should respond to a corrupt and heartless system of government that weaponises social status against its own people. There’s never any doubt that something needs to be done – but is meeting violence with violence really the answer, even when all other arguments seem to have failed?

Throughout the show, the characters are forced to make choices – sometimes with the audience’s help, other times alone. In some cases, there’s a clear right and wrong; in others, it’s not so black and white. The impact of each choice is then felt throughout the rest of the play, demonstrating how the decisions we make every day can resonate and affect not just our own lives but those of people around us. Cleverly written and deeply unsettling, this trio of stories sends its audience home reflecting on both the possible future we’ve just seen, and on our own actions and attitudes in the here and now. Highly recommended for a thought-provoking evening.

The final performance of Classified is at the Lion and Unicorn Theatre tonight (12th October).